The finish has PTFE (like Teflon) that helps reduce friction and the resulting heat. Vortex needle coolers use cold compressed air to further cool needles

  • 135x17 type needles have a round top (no flat side) for industrial upholstery and walking foot machines.

    Less Thread Breakage, Less Sticking, Less Downtime.
    The CS Cool-Sew finish on the needle surfaces and in the needle’s eye is resistant to sticking. Its finish has a very low friction coefficient, which prevents excessive heat buildup and resulting problems. Few, if any, materials stick to the surfaces of Cool-Sew needles. Cool-Sew needles are ideal for stitching through vinyl, synthetics, chemically treated materials, glued materials, rubberized goods, nylon, foam, dense materials, and with synthetic threads. When Cool-Sew needles are used under conditions described above you can expect neater stitches, less sewing thread breakage, less puckered stitches, less downtime, less defects, and increased productivity.

    Regular needles show buildup of sticking fibers while Cool-Sew needle is free of buildup.

    As synthetic threads pass through the eye of a needle, they
    create friction and heat which may melt or snap threads. In
    some cases, the eye of the needle may be cut. The COOLSEW
    finished needle eye acts as if eye is lubricated and
    thereby alleviates the aforementioned problems.
    As an ordinary chromium plated needle penetrates through
    synthetic materials, the materials may stick to the needle.
    This may cause some of the synthetic materials to pass
    through the needle holes and create undesirable finishes.
    The sticking to the surface of the needle may also create
    heat-buildup problems such as melting and machine jamups.
    The COOL-SEW finish on the needle helps alleviate the
    sticking and heat-buildup problems.
Specifications
Recommended Thread

Needle & Thread Size Compatibility Chart for Industrial Sewing Machines(.PDF)

Tech Sew Needle Thread Chart

Needle System 135x17 for Upholstery or 135x16 for Leather Vinyl Industrial Sewing Machines

Compatible with Artisan Machine Models:
29, 611, 618, 618-1SC, 797, 797AB-800/AB/ABN, 797AB LTHR/ABNS LTHR, 2618, 2698, 4400, 4400-25/LTHR, 4420, 4420-25, 6191 and SC LTHR.

Compatible with Brother Machine Models:
DB2-B727, DB2-B797, DB2-B798, LS2-B837, LS2-B877, LS2-B891, LS3-C51, LS3-C53 and LT2-B838.

Compatible with Chandler Machine Models:
DY-337.

Compatible with Consew Machine Models:
28, 118R, 119R, 146RB, 166R, 166RB, 206RB, 223, 224, 225, 226, 226R-1, 227, 229, 239, 244, 254, 255, 255RB, 277, 282, 288, 289, 339, 358, 382 and 389.

Compatible with Durkopp Machine Models:
147-1 and 147-2.

Compatible with Feiyue Machine Models:
FY5318.

Compatible with Juki Machine Models:
DNU-241, DNU-1541, DNU-1541S, LH-517, LH-518, LH-527, LH-1162, LH-1182, LK-980, LU-562, LU-563, LU-1510, LUH-521, LUH-562, MOL-100PA and MOL-100PSA.

Compatible with Mercury Machine Models:
280L and 280LS.

Compatible with Mitsubishi Machine Models:
CU-865-12, CU-865-22, DU-100, DU-110, DU-120, DY-339, DY-340 and DY-349.

Compatible with Sailrite Machine Models:
111, Big-N-Tall, Professional, Ultrafeed LS-1 and Ultrafeed LSZ-1.

Compatible with Seiko Machine Models:
CW-7, CW-7B, CW-8. CW-8B, CW-8V, LAH-1LC, LCW Class, LLW Class, LLWH Class, LPW-8, LPW-26, LPW-27, LPW-28, LSC Class, LSW Class, PW Class, STH Class, STW Class, TD-2 and TD-6.

Compatible with Singer Machine Models:
111G, 111W, 111W112, 111W151, 111W153, 138B, 153W, 168G, 168W, 211A, 211G, 211U, 211W.

Compatible with Yamata Machine Models:
FY5318.

Alternative Part Numbers Include 145646-0-23, SY3355, MR4, DPX17, MC-3720016-00, MC-3515016-00

The Cool-Sew finish was developed to alleviate needle problems resulting from the following situations:
1) Heat Buildup in penetration of synthetic, chemically treated, or very dense materials
2) Materials or residue sticking to needle surface or in eye
3) Excessive sewing thread breakage due to friction in the needle eye

The COOL-SEW finish needle's surfaces, even in the eye, are resistant to sticking. Its non-stick finish has a very low friction coefficient which prevents excessive heat buildup and its resulting problems. Few, if any, materials stick to the surfaces of Cool-Sew needles. When COOL-SEW needles are used under conditions described above you can expect neater stitches, less sewing thread breakage, less puckered stitches, less downtime, less defects, and increased productivity. COOL-SEW needles are ideal for sewing through vinyl, synthetics, chemically treated materials, glued materials, rubberized goods, nylon, foam, dense materials, and with synthetic threads.
How do I reduce resistance of the needle going through 1/4" dense vinyl, leather, skins and canvas? Can I increase presser foot height on my portable walking foot sewing machine? Jonathan
Jonathan, Adjusting the presser foot height would only aggravate the problem of needle resistance in your 1/4" vinyl materials under the foot. It would be better to make sure the machine is well lubricated (including motor shaft at both ends) until it gets up to top speed without needle, thread and fabric. Then use the PTFE Cool Sew coated needles to lessen resistance in materials. Then use silicone to spray on the thread, needle and vinyl materials (silicone is colorless, odorless and stainless) to further reduce resistance. Please advise what works best. Thanks. John

What is PTFE?
Polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) is a synthetic fluoropolymer of tetrafluoroethylene that finds numerous applications. The best known brand name of PTFE is Teflon by DuPont Co.

PTFE is a fluorocarbon solid, as it is a high-molecular-weight compound consisting wholly of carbon and fluorine. PTFE is hydrophobic: neither water nor water-containing substances wet PTFE, as fluorocarbons demonstrate mitigated London dispersion forces due to the high electronegativity of fluorine. PTFE has one of the lowest coefficients of friction against any solid.

PTFE is used as a non-stick coating for pans and other cookware. It is very non-reactive, partly because of the strength of carbon–fluorine bonds, and so it is often used in containers and pipework for reactive and corrosive chemicals. Where used as a lubricant, PTFE reduces friction, wear, and energy consumption of machinery.

It is commonly believed that Teflon is a spin-off product from the NASA space projects. However, that is not so, although it has been used by NASA.[2] Wikipedia

Polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) is the chemical name for Teflon®. This is a highly saturated fluorocarbon polymer which was discovered by Roy Plunkett, a 27-year-old research chemist working at the DuPont Research Laboratories in Deepwater, New Jersey in 1938.
Two dry film lubricants compared; the competing product on the left and the smooth, even, consistent coating of MicroCare dry film lubricants on the right.
Plunkett's polymer had some remarkable properties: it was not attacked by corrosive acids, even if they were hot; it did not dissolve in solvents; it could be cooled to -240°C without becoming brittle and it could be heated to 260°C without impairing its performance. PTFE materials also are extremely stable and nonflammable; clean, dry, non-oily and non-staining. The material is biologically inert and does not support biological growth (that is, it is non-pyrogenic). For more details about PTFE, see the DuPont web site.

Plunkett also noted that the substance had a slippery feel, which is why you are reading this page today. Lubricants based on PTFE offer an extremely low static coefficient of friction, which stems from the extremely low intermolecular forces (van der Waals forces) in the PTFE molecule itself.

How PTFE Works

With a ratio of four fluorine atoms to every two carbon atoms, the carbon-based heart of the molecule is essentially shielded from contact with any other molecule. It’s almost impossible for any other chemical structure to gain access to the carbon atoms. This gives PTFE the extraordinary chemical resistance mentioned above. It’s tough for a solvent or other agent to degrade the molecule if the carbon is "out of reach." Even if another atom or substance could gain access, the carbon-to-fluorine bonds have high bond disassociation energy, making them almost unbreakable. But the fluorine does even more.

Fluorine is "anti-social" and doesn't want to associate with other atoms. So as part of a PTFE molecule, it wants to get as far away from other atoms as possible. Anything getting close is automatically repelled, so repelled molecules can’t stick to the PTFE surface. Which is why PTFE is called "the slipperiest material in the world."
Organ Needles, New York NY
When sewing through plastic, rubber, or similar materials that generate a lot of friction and heat, we suggest the use of the ORGAN "COOL-SEW"/LP needles. The finish has PTFE (like Teflon) that helps reduce friction and the resulting heat. The PD/Perfect-Durability titanium finish is smoother than chrome needles and may alleviate some heat buildup, but the the Cool-Sew/LP needles perform much better at reducing friction heat. The PD/Perfect Durability titanium needles are intended to make the needles more resistant to wear. PD/titanium needles, for example, will have points that will last longer than the points of chromium plated needles. We suggest that for this customer's problem you should try the Organ Cool-Sew/LP needles.